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Become an Ally

Being an ally is about disrupting oppressive spaces by educating others on the realities and histories of marginalized people.

Resources for more information:

Image: Medicine bundle with sage, sweetgrass, cedar, and prayer fan, courtesy of Paulla Adamitz from Sucker Creek First Nation

(Photo: Lauri MacKinnon, 2021) Mode LaVan Photography

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Indigenous Reads

Adult

See All Adult

Children & Tween

See All Children & Tween

Celebrating Indigenous Picture Books

image of the book cover'From sea to sea to sea'

IBBY Canada is pleased to present the 2021 edition of From Sea to Sea to Sea: Celebrating Indigenous Picture Books

Twenty five of the best Indigenous picture books published in Canada between 2018–2020 were selected for this collection. Care was taken to ensure that the collection reflects the diversity of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit voices from sea to sea to sea, and that the titles are available and in print for anyone who wishes to access them. 

All of these titles are available to borrow through the TRAC library system with your library card.

35 Books to Read for National Indigenous Month#IndigenousReads Diverse Book Finder - IndigenousBooks by Indigenous Writers to Read to Understand Residential SchoolsSaskatoon Public Library Recommended ListsFurther reading suggestions can be found throughout the library on bookmarks and other brochures. Ask library staff for readers advisory assistance - we'd love to help!
Metis Ribbon Shirt/Metis Regalia, and hand made moose hide drum bag. The shirt is white with red and blue ribbon and embroidery.

The shirt is a Metis Ribbon Shirt/Metis Regalia, and hand made moose hide drum bag, courtesy of Murray MacKinnon from Papaschase First Nation and Cree Mukluks, courtesy of Paulla Adamitz from Sucker Creek First Nation (Photo: Lauri MacKinnon, 2021) Mode LaVan Photography

Image: The shirt is a Metis Ribbon Shirt/ Metis Regalia, and hand made moose hide drum bag, courtesy of Murray MacKinnon from Papaschase First Nation and Cree Mukluks, courtesy of Paulla Adamitz from Sucker Creek First Nation

(Photo: Lauri MacKinnon, 2021) Mode LaVan Photography

Library Resources

backpack containing cree language books and other items for children
Literacy Backpacks offer parents and caregivers the opportunity to share stories and the love of reading with children. They encourage lively interaction with theme-based books, puppets, games and activities. We have Cree, Metis, Inuit and many more. Indigenous Peoples Themed Fiction for Adults Indigenous Peoples Themed Fiction for Teens Indigenous Peoples Themed Fiction for Middle Grades Indigenous Peoples Themed Books for Everyone Indigenous Peoples Themed Non Fiction for Adults Indigenous Peoples Themed Non Fiction for Middle Grades Indigenous Peoples Themed Graphic Novels for Adults Indigenous Peoples Themed Graphic Novels for Teens Indigenous Peoples Themed Graphic Novels for Middle Grades Indigenous Peoples Themed Audiovisual Items for Adults
To access this online collection, login with your TRAC barcode number and Pin # Prairie Indigenous eBook Collection

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Welcome to Our Gathering Place

This page is dedicated to providing information regarding Indigenous opportunities and programs in the Tri-Region and surrounding area. You can view each monthly calendar by clicking on the link. Learn more about each program, including registration by scrolling down the page and clicking on the appropriate links.

Powwow listings in your area!

Click HERE

 

Skydancer Indigenous Cultural Society (SICS)

Visit their website for all their upcoming artist shows, programs and events.

Connecting with Indigenous Neighbours Meeting

Purpose:
We are Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples who gather and reside on Treaty 6 land and care deeply about the land, Treaty relationships and our community. We will build trust and reconcile with one another through relationship, ceremony, the arts and celebration.
Open to all community members that have a passion about building Indigenous connections

Meetings are currently on hold until further notice.

Indigenous Story Telling (SGPL Program) will resume in September, 2023*

Story telling is an importance way to learn about and from Indigenous communities. This new program was created to honour Indigenous cultures and to promote intercultural understanding and communication between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. Join Knowledge Keeper Barbara for a fun, interactive story telling with songs, and puppets.

Alternate Fridays starting on September 15 from 10:30am-11:00am.

Ages: 2-6 with caregivers (siblings & friends are welcome)

In person, drop-in at the Spruce Grove Public Library

*Indigenous Story Telling will also be taking place at Entwistle and the Stony Plain Public Library in the fall of 2023. Visit their websites for more details.

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Pride Storytime FAQ
Diversity

This page has been developed to include our community in the sharing of knowledge around terms and information regarding diversity with the willingness to join SGPL as we learn, unlearn and relearn together.

Definition of Drag

Drag is a type of entertainment where people dress up and perform, often in highly stylized ways.

The term originated as British theater slang in the 19th century and was used to describe women’s clothing worn by men. The term "drag" refers to the performance of masculinity, femininity or other forms of gender expression.

 

Painting of King Lear Act I Scene I by artist Edwin Austin Abbey

The history of drag queens is an evolution from a common theatre practice to an award-winning form of entertainment that has gained legitimacy both on a national and international stage.With its mainstream success, some may be surprised to learn that the history of drag as a form of entertainment dates back to Ancient Greek and Shakespearean times and for more utilitarian purposes. Indeed, the history of drag seems to be one inextricably tied to the theater. in the 17th century when Shakespeare's plays were first performed at the Globe Theatre in London, only men were allowed to take part in the productions. So when plays included female parts, the male actors would dress as women to fill the void.It's in the theatre that the term "drag" is believed to have originated. When men played female parts, they would supposedly discuss how their costume dresses would "drag" across the floor.Drag began to take on more of an individual form of entertainment (as opposed to being utilized as a part of an ensemble performance) when female impersonation was introduced into American culture via the genre known as "vaudeville."Vaudeville performance gained traction in the early 20th century in the United States, and it combines comedy, music, dance, and burlesque to create an offbeat type of live entertainment.In the modern era, where the internet can bring marginalized communities into the spotlight, drag has found a fan base that's become larger than life. The drag queen has entered the mainstream once again — and this time, it seems like it's here to stay.Find out more about how these story time events are being deeply mischaracterized:A Brief History Of Drag Queen Story Hour - Huffington Post, 2023The Evolution of Drag: A History of Self-Expressionism - Byarcadia.org, 2021

To sum it up it’s about having fun, celebrating diversity and letting kids know there’s nothing wrong with them if they don’t follow the “normal” gender rules such as only girls like pink and boys like blue or girls play with dolls and boys with trucks. If they’re totally the opposite, then that’s just fine! In these times especially it’s so important to promote kindness and inclusivity. Exposure to a diversity of cultures and lifestyles develops a deeper level of understanding of others. People with this knowledge are more likely to have strong collaboration skills and are less likely to discriminate/bully those that are different.“Drag Queen Storytime provides an opportunity for parents to begin to have conversations with their kids about respecting other types of people and reassuring them that they will love their child however he or she chooses to express themselves.”Dr. Joe Kort, Drag Queen Storytime for Children: Is listening to a drag queen read a story dangerous for a child? - Psychology Today, 2019

Fluffy Soufflé and Fay Slift stand together in promotion for The Fabulous show on the Family Channel, where an audience of cheering kids usher in each episode.

Drag storytimes have become a target of hate. Why some families love them anyway - CBC News, 2022

Firefighter wearing breathing apparatus standing by children during a library visit

Firefighter Storytime with Gwinnett County Fire Department

When a fire fighter does a story time, a guest athlete, or any other local dignitary they are not trained in child literacy. They are taking part in the storytime because they want to share the gift of stories with the children in the program, this is the same with drag queens, they are sharing child appropriate content and guest presenting a storytime that is bright and colourful, celebrating differences and uniqueness.
Miss Shirley, the alter ego of Denver third-grade teacher Stuart Sanks. They are wearing a dress with rainbows and unicorns and a large pink foam wig.

Miss Shirley, storytime presenter at a drag queen storytime in Denver, Colorado.

Miss Shirley, the alter ego of Denver third-grade teacher Stuart Sanks, (pictured here) does have a background in literacy and education. Some guest presenters do have this knowledge, however, it is not a requirement as we value external program facilitators expertise in their own fields.

If this program does not meet your needs, we respect your choice not to attend, and hope that you will find a Library program that does meet your needs.The Library offers a variety of engaging programs, including a number of regular storytimes, and we look forward to welcoming you at those.As proud participants in the global Libraries are for Everyone campaign, we promote equality, acceptance, and safety for all.  Additionally, the Spruce Grove Public Library 2019-2023 Plan of Service, the document that directs all or our programs and services, was created by a Community Planning Committee comprised of Spruce Grove residents that advised the library to focus on three areas in everything we do: practice and promote inclusion, provide a welcoming place, and encourage literacy.Spruce Grove Public Library along with all libraries in our province subscribes to the Library Association of Alberta’s Statement on Intellectual Freedom which states:“Alberta libraries have a responsibility to guarantee and facilitate access to all expressions of knowledge, opinion, creativity and intellectual activity including those which some elements of society consider unconventional, unpopular, unorthodox or unacceptable.” Throughout the year, SGPL promotes many celebrations and supports all people.Ultimately, parents and guardians are responsible for supervising Library use by their – and only their - children. The Library does not stand in loco parentis and cannot allow others to censor or decide on the library activities of other children. "Nobody is forcing any parent to take their child to a Drag Queen Story Hour. The children who do attend are not being exposed to pornography. They are being exposed to children’s books for children. The uproar over such a sincerely wholesome event makes it plain what the issue really is: not parental rights. Not sexualization. Not the content of what the drag queens are reading to the kids. It’s the existence of drag queens. It’s the idea that someone might present in a way that was at odds with a certain vision of how men or women should dress or present or behave."Monica Hesse, Drag queens are not the ones sexualizing drag story hour - Washington Post, 2022

Libraries are for everyone, but everyone may not want to participate in what we offer all of the time. At the same time; there is something for everyone and we are here to help you find whatever that is for you.The Library offers a variety of engaging programs, including a number of regular storytimes, and we look forward to welcoming you at those.Take a look at our calendar of upcoming programs and events for other activities on offer. We provide programs on a variety of topics, for various age groups and demographics year-round!
The History and Rise of Gendered Colours and the Feminization of the Colour Pink  
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Diversity FAQ
picture of lightbulbs with words inside including disability, inclusion, orientation, equality, gender, diversity, age, differences and race
Diversity

This page has been developed to include our community in the sharing of knowledge around terms and information regarding diversity with the willingness to join SGPL as we learn, unlearn and relearn together.

Diversity: diversity encompasses race, religious belief, indigeneity, colour, gender, physical disability, mental disability, marital status, ancestry, age, place of origin, family status, sexual orientation, and gender identification, as well as other characteristics that shape an individual’s attitudes, behaviours and perspectives. Equity: Striving for a system that benefits everyone, no matter their circumstance. Inclusion: It’s the act of welcoming, supporting, respecting, and valuing all individuals and groups. 
Venn diagram of three overlapping circles representing diversity equity and inclusion. The centre part is labelled belonging.
Spruce Grove Public Library offers information and resources about issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion. Please browse the following links below to find some resources available via the Spruce Grove Public Library website: SGPL's Vision, Mission, and ValuesThe Value of SGPL Accessibility Services Diversity and Inclusion Reads Indigenous Resources 
Spruce Grove Public Library's commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion. Everyone should be able to realize their potential at Spruce Grove Public Library. Everyone has a right to feel respected, safe, and included within the library and community. To ensure that, we must work to eliminate societal barriers to full inclusion in our programs, services, internal operations, and institutional culture. We have a responsibility to create and maintain an environment of equity, diversity, inclusion, and dignity in all spaces we occupy and in all aspects of our community role. We continue to listen, learn, and act in collaboration with the City of Spruce Grove and community partners.Spruce Grove Public library is committed to the value of diversity, equity and inclusion. Please complete our online form to share any comments or concerns about diversity, equity and inclusion in Spruce Grove Public Library. Please note that all submissions will be kept confidential in compliance with FOIP legislation; if necessary to complete the investigation, a person information release may be required. All concerns and/or complaints will be forwarded to the Community Complaints Officer who will deliver the message to the Director of Library Services.
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Accessibility Services

The Spruce Grove Public Library is committed to creating an inclusive environment so all individuals can access and participate in the library through our programs, services and space (virtual and in-person).

Accessibility Services available at SGPL:

The library recognizes the need, at times, to have specially-trained animals that assist persons with disabilities. To balance customer needs with health and safety concerns, only service animals may visit the library. Service animals are working animals, not "pets," and include therapy animals (e.g. Emotional Support Animals). Further details can be found under the FAQ page.We have collection of books embossed with braille, including children's titles. These are listed in the TRAC catalogue. We also have a Braille Gaming Kit.SGPL has main doors that open with the push of a button. The library is all located on one floor at ground floor level with no stairs or elevators required to access our collections or programs. The parking lot also has two accessible stalls right at the front doors.Library too bright or too noisy? We now have Calming Supports Kits to make your library experience more enjoyable.We have sunglasses and noise-cancelling headphones (for both adults and kids sizes). We also have weighted lap pads, sensory seat cushions, fidget toys and other sensory items. These kits are for use in-house for adults and kids that may need adaptations for their visit. Just ask at the front desk.
We have Communication Visual Menus available at the Front Desk to aid as a communication tool with non-verbal and hard of hearing patrons and improve their library experience. If preferred, you can bring your own copy with you.Full-page magnifying readers are available for in-house use. Find them at the Information Desk.
The library can be noisy sometimes. We have noise cancelling headphones and earplugs available for use in the library at the Circulation Desk.A print disability is a learning, physical or visual disability that prevents a person from reading conventional print. It can be temporary or permanent. More specifically, a print disability can be a:Learning disability: An impairment relating to comprehensionPhysical disability: The inability to hold or manipulate a bookVisual disability: Severe or total impairment of sight or the inability to focus or move one’s eyesWe have a variety of collections, tools and services to support you. Including:Large print booksAudiobooks on CD and MP3 (DAISY compatible)BrailleDigital Audiobooks and eBooks available through Hoopla, Libby (formerly known as Overdrive), Alberta eBooks, Cloud LibraryDAISY players (CELA patrons only)Kobo reader (CELA patrons only)Looking for even more? SGPL is also connected to:the Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA)  & the National Network for Equitable Library Service (NNELS)To register with these organizations, you will need a current library card. Once registered, you can access these additional resources:Accessible Books, eBooks, magazines, and newspapers;Downloadable content for your computer, smart device, and DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) player;CD and Braille formats delivered by mail;Bookshare, the world’s largest accessible online digital library, a filled in copy of this form is required for Bookshare access;Bilingual collections and services.For assistance registering for these services, call 780-962-4423 (ext. '103') or email reference@sgpl.ca Program age recommendations are simply a guideline for content. Everyone is welcome to attend, regardless of age or ability!These programs are for everyone. Online programs will be captioned.If you require another access service to fully participate or have any questions about accessibility, please contact the Programming Team at asgprogramming@yrl.ab.ca or call us at 780-962-4423 ext. 0.To ensure the best experience, please try to contact us at your soonest convenience.We invite you to experience our Sensory Corner, located in the Children's Area but accessible to users of all ages and abilities. Provided by the Foundation for Cohesive Communities.
sensory corner including a bubble tube, optic fibre cords, a ladybug beanbag chair and other items
Carts and rolling baskets are available in-house to help you, whilst browsing the library.Now it's even easier to get to the library and all around Spruce Grove!Did you know Spruce Grove has on-demand local transit?With no fixed schedule or route, customers choose their pick up times and locations by booking their trip through the app, online, or by calling. And, with more stop locations and longer service hours it’s easier than ever to get around Spruce Grove. Check it out at www.sprucegrove.org/OnDemandTransit
Many of our washrooms are gender-inclusive for anyone to use, regardless of their gender identity or presentation. Our washrooms all have changing tables available.We are striving to make our website and social media content more accessible and reduce barriers. This is a work in progress and we are working towards being WCAG 2.0 compliant.

For more information and requests for accommodation​:​

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Diversity & Inclusion Reads

DEI: Adults

See All DEI: Adults

Where to find diverse books? - diversebooks.orgWorking for racial diversity and inclusion in books for children and teens - Reading While WhiteDiversity Resources - Cooperative Children's Book CenterFurther reading and learning suggestions can be found throughout the library on bookmarks and other brochures. Ask library staff for readers advisory assistance - we'd love to help!
a selection of bookmarks with themed book suggestions
Literacy Backpacks offer parents and caregivers the opportunity to share stories and the love of reading with children. They encourage lively interaction with theme-based books, puppets, games and activities. We have a DEI (Diversity Equity & Inclusion) focused backpack, along with Cree, Métis, Inuit and many more.We've got a whole new array of kits you can enjoy. Take a look at our Gadgets and Gizmos Galore for language kits (including American Sign Language), Braille Gaming, Feelings Gaming, Listening and Music items along with many others.
Two literacy backpacks covering Around the World and DEI topics
LGBTQIA2S+ Pathfinders (last updated May 2022)LGBTQ+ Themed Books for AdultsLGBTQ+ Themed Books for TeensLGBTQ+ Themed Books for Middle GradesLGBTQ+ Themed Books for EveryoneLGBTQ+ Themed Movies and TV Shows
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Concerns & Complaints

Reporting a Concern or Complaint

SGPL receives and responds to governance and operational concerns and conflicts in a transparent, timely, and constructive manner to provide a diverse, equitable, and inclusive environment where everyone feels valued. 

Concerns and complaints flagged for verbal abuse, harassment, discrimination, and/or threats are subject to review and consultation with the RCMP which results in unavoidable disruptions to the response process.

Guiding Principle

SGPL trustees, staff, and volunteers perform their roles and responsibilities with high standards of professional and personal ethics and must comply with all applicable library legislation, policy, protocols, and procedures while resolving concerns and complaints as they arise. 

Process

  1. All public concerns and/or complaints can be communicated informally by phone (780-962-4423, ext. 301) or in-person (35 Fifth Avenue, Spruce Grove); and/or formally by submitting this form. Please note that all submissions will be kept confidential in compliance with FOIP legislation; if necessary to complete the investigation, a person information release may be required,
  2. All concerns and/or complaints will be forwarded to the Community Complaints Officer who will deliver the message to the Director of Library Services.
    • If the Director is the subject of concern or complaint, the information is delivered to the Board Chair; 
    • If the Board Chair is subject of the Concern or Complaint, the information is delivered through the Director to the Board Vice-Chair or Committee Chair.
  3. Each complaint must demonstrate they have made a report in good faith.
  4. If the complainant is not satisfied with the response, they can elevate and present their concern or complaint at a Board meeting in a timely manner.
  5. A detailed complaints/concerns report is annually presented to the Board by the Director.
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TRAC

The Regional Automation Consortium

TRAC (The Regional Automation Consortium) is a partnership of Marigold Library System, Northern Lights Library System, Peace Library System, Yellowhead Regional Library, and their member libraries. Using TRACpac you can search a combined catalogue of over 170 libraries with holdings of nearly three million books, DVDs and other material.

TRAC also participates in Alberta-wide borrowing through ME Libraries. Patrons registered through ME Libraries may borrow materials from any TRAC library, subject to local policies and lending periods.

The libraries within TRAC wish to acknowledge Treaty 6, Treaty 7, and Treaty 8 territory, as well as the Métis Nation of Alberta. The TRAC libraries are located on territory that provided a travelling route and home to many Indigenous peoples.

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Yellowhead Regional Library

Yellowhead Regional Library provides services to 303,695 Albertans in 54 municipalities and 10,822 students in three school divisions. Our priority is to provide quality library services to our 43 municipal and 43 school libraries. We continuously strive to be responsive to the needs of our members. 

Our headquarters is located in Spruce Grove, Alberta, Canada.

Creating shared value

Yellowhead Regional Library’s (YRL) commitment to its member libraries is an active, ongoing approach that seeks to enrich the collections, resources and services offered to Albertans in the Yellowhead Region.

Simply put, YRL is always growing, learning and sourcing new resources to help make each member library the best it can be.

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